Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

Savings is almost Impossible in UAE

In the UAE, a severe absence of a savings culture, that’s been said and proven time and time again. The image of a tax-free salary and comfortable lifestyle continues to attract thousands of expatriates from all over the world to leave their homes, jobs and even families, to come to UAE for a better life.

But are we saving this ‘extra’ money we’re supposedly earning here? The results of yet another survey say otherwise.

Souqalmal.com, a leading price comparison site in the Middle East, says that 65 percent of their 900 respondents admit they want to be saving more than they actually are. So, on the bright side, at least there’s a desire to save, but half of them claim they save absolutely nothing at all, while 44 percent complain that they’re saving less than they did three years ago.

“The combination of high living costs, the perception of “being rich” due to no taxes and a lack of education on how to manage income and debt could explain the results of our survey,’ says Ambareen Musa, Souqalmal’s founder.

“While enjoying a good quality of life now is important, saving adequate amounts for the future is even more so, especially as people typically do not accrue social benefits while working in the UAE,” says Musa.

The next bit of the study groups the best savers in the country according to their nationality – and if you’d allow Kipp to slightly digress – we must say we aren’t completely fond of segregation by nationality. But here are the facts if you’re interested.

Apparently, western expats are the best savers; being able to put 10 to 30 percent of their monthly income away, followed by Asian expats, with one third of them saving within that same range. Thirty percent of nationals in the UAE do not save any money at all and, lastly, the study suggests that ‘Arab expats seem to find it harder to save’ with 12 percent admitting they don’t even know how to save and 32 percent claiming they save nothing at all.

Why people fail to save ? It is the Plastic money culture which is on boom again. Banks have smartly trapped people by allowing a limit of 1.5 times the actual pay cheque. means if a person is making AED 5000 the credit card limit is AED 7000. Such entrapment is the root cause of Zero-Savings culture across local & expatriates equally. While the locals manage to get a waiver for fees & markups, and can pay off in easy installments after settlement, while the expats end up in jails. Thats called Discriminated Economic Lynching ! :)

June 29 2014 – Sunday – Ramadan 01 1435

Blessings & best wishes for the Holy month of Ramadan to mankind across the world.

May ALLAH (swt) forgive and accept our fast, salat, & zakat ( mandatory charity ) with enough opportunities to help needy mankind (ameen)

No outdoor work in UAE from 12:30-15:00

June 15 to Sept 15 a work ban during the hottest hours of the day are enforced. Only to ensure the safety of outdoor workers many of whom had suffered from exhaustion before the ban was enforced years ago.

All GCC nations also began implementing the summer work ban following persistent heat and sunstroke cases among outdoor workers and growing global concerns about the expatriate workers’ human rights.

The lighter side of Dubai

About Dubai..some may find this funny but there’s some truth in it..

Dubai is the land of the biggest, tallest, longest, widest, richest, fanciest, fastest…everything is … in the world.

They have the tallest residential towers in the world, the tallest restaurant in the world, the largest number of Malbaris in the world, the highest crane operator in the world.

If it does not grow in Dubai, they’ ll make it artificially – artificial ski slopes, artificial islands, artificial oasis,
coconut trees and lawns, artificial beaches, artificial economy.

Indians especially love it here because of the dirham-to-rupee value. Pakistani’s adore it.

The Egyptians come here because there is nothing to do in Egypt. No more pyramids to build either.

The Filipinos come here because they have no choice; theres nothing back home, not even dogs – they’ve been eaten up.

The Brits come here coz they have forgotten what it is to enjoy 3 meals a day in UK and nobody employs them there for the crap they give. .

The Lebanese come here to buy cars, dress to kill, wear Peter Pan shoes 10 sizes bigger than their feet, put 1 kg of gel on their heads and give everyone ball talk.

They’ll buy a 1980s Merc or BMW for 10k dirhams and drive the car like they’re sitting in the rear passenger seat, stretching their arms all the way to the steering wheel, giving you the piercing bald eagle look.

Russian girls come here for “fun”.

The Bangladeshis come here to serve you when you honk outside a Bakala (shop), but would not even look at you if you park and go inside to pickup yourself.

Now according to the government Dubai is Tax free. Of course, that is true. You only have to pay for the visa, medical, sponser, insurance, resident ID, Opening a bank account or even closing an account, Municipality, Sewerage, attestation of papers, translation of papers, driving license papers, lessons, Car license, testing, and …. but the salary is Tax Free.

Only, there is a Pay and Park scheme with 5000 parking lots, and 500,000 cars in the city, so where the hell do you park? And you are fined for wrong parking.

Toll has been introduced on many roads. You can avoid the toll tax by using alternative routes, but you’ll end up in a traffic jam because everyone is trying to avoid the toll tax.

If you have any government related work like medicals for visa or immigration, you have 2 options – Standard and Urgent Procedure. Standard takes 7 days and Urgent takes 1 day. The difference is 100-odd dirhams. Everyone goes for the urgent option and the Dubai government makes money, urgently.

If you switch jobs you get a work ban and to lift the ban you pay a huge penalty.

In Dubai, without a car you are paralyzed (you dont even get jobs if you dont have a car). But you ‘ll get your license in attempts ranging from 2 to 20. Each time you fail you have paid fees for Driving Classes & Driving Tests, which are 1000-odd dirhams. Imagine the money RTA makes.

Most of the expats live alone with families back home. So they spend much on phone calls. And call charges from Dubai are high.

Another odd thing about Dubai – no matter where you go or who you meet, you take down phone numbers. Everybody has everybodys number in Dubai. And everyone has a Visiting Card, whether you are a bootlegger, a masseuse, a hooker, a car cleaner, a watchman or a pizza delivery boy. Everyone knocks around with lots of cards in his or her wallet and one card in the palm. So whenever you shake hands with anyone in Dubai and let go, you end up with a visiting card in your palm.

If youre walking on the road and you ask someone the time, he’ll tell you 10:30, give you his card and say, I have new and second-hand watches.

At a restaurant when you are leaving they’ll say Here is my card, call us for home delivery.

If you’re below your building, you’ll meet those Chinese chicks giving you their cards, saying, Call us if you want DVDs.

If youre standing at a bus stop, a Pakistani will pull over in his 1980 Toyota Corolla, give you his card and say, If you want Pick-up & Drop Service, call me.

Dubai has amusing-looking buildings. Some have holes in them, some have giant balls on them, some look like aeroplanes, some look like sail boats, and, all of them reach into space with your window right in front of the moon.

Everyone in Dubai goes to malls. Not necessarily to shop. To beat the heat, go to a mall; business meeting, go to a mall; getting bored, go to a mall; want to take a leak or dump, go to a mall; want to do lukhagiri (little in your pocket, little in your mind), go to a mall. If you want to go for a picnic go to a mall.

Some Malbaris go home to Kerala, get married, and then come to a Dubai Mall’s for their honeymoon.

THAT…MY FRIENDS…..IS

DOO-BAI

Dubai .. here comes EXPO 2020

Congratulations Vice-President and Prime Minister and Ruler of Dubai, His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, on Dubai’s winning the bid to host EXPO 2020

Congratulations to Rulers of UAE,

Clear all penalties & fines – for visa cancellation

Local arabic news paper reported today the change in visa cancellation procedure for expatriates. Infact the RTA & Traffic police are now interconnected with the Ministry of Interior Department of Immigrations. Any visa cancellation is subject to clearance from the RTA & Traffic police. Fines penalties, motor vehicle related pending issues will stay RED flagged unless cleared by the owner / licence holder.

Similarly UAE Govt will shortly be linking utility services & civil defence with the Immigration. Expats will not be able to cancel their visas without clearance of the respective departments

Ministry of Finance Central bank is already linked to UAE immigration dept to keep check on defaulters

Dubai – Think Think & Think all that shines is not valuable

a place aiming for 2020 expo is hub of all misfortunes in terms of humanity and human rights

Living in Dubai is not wonderful and glamorous, as many would have you believe. Forget about what you’ve read, seen, and heard; those shiny buildings and man made islands are all just smoke and mirrors. There are so many things wrong with this place that I have decided to compile a list, a must read if you are considering a potential move to Dubai.

Basically for being tax heaven, all ‘dark money’ from international Mafias is dumped in dubai real estate. No economy based on ‘General Trading’ with Fees applicable once a year does not thrive as portrayed in dubai. Neighboring KSA is biggest critic of happenings in Dubai

1. There is no standard address system making mail-to-the door delivery impossible. In fact, it makes anything nearly impossible. The taxi driver, here for only two days, and having learned English from old Beatles albums has no clue where your house is. He won’t tell you that of course, he’ll just keep calling and saying, “Okay, okay. Yeah, yeah.” When you purchase something that requires delivery they do not have an address line, but a box where you are expected to draw a map. Not able to draw a map? Explain like this: I live on the street after the airport road, but before the roundabout. Go past the mosque and make a U-turn.

2. The government blocks all web sites that it deems “offensive” to the “religious, moral, and cultural values” of the UAE. That’s hard to swallow for a freedom loving American, but I get it. I do not understand, however, why all VOIP access and related web sites are blocked. I guess the government also takes offense to people inexpensively contacting their families back home. You’re welcome to call using the analog service provided by the government-owned telephone monopoly, but it will cost you a whole lot more. So much so, in fact, your frequency of calls will be greatly diminished if you can afford them at all. The government says VOIP is blocked for security reasons, yet even the residents of communist China and North Korea have access to these inexpensive calls.

3. It is really hot outside. Not Florida in July hot; Hot as if you were locked in a car in Florida in July with sufficient humidity to make it feel as though you are drowning. Hot as in 120 degrees with nearly 100% humidity. Do not look to the wind for relief. This is the equivalent of pointing a hairdryer on full blast directly at your face. Pour fine moon dust-like sand over your head as you do this and you get the picture.

4. There are too few trees, plants, and grass – or living things aside from us crazy humans, for that matter. Ever see a bird pant? I have. In my opinion, human beings were not meant to live in such a place. If we were, there would be sufficient water and shade. The only greenery around are the roadside gardens planted by the government, who waters the hell out of them in the middle of the day. Thanks a lot! Didn’t you say we should cut down on our water consumption because you are unable to keep up with the demand? I have an idea: let’s all move someplace where it’s not 120 degrees outside.

5. This country prides itself so much on its glitz and glamour that it put a picture of its 7-star hotel on the license plate. Yet, the public toilets in the king-of-bling Gold Souk district are holes in the ground with no toilet paper or soap. Hoses to rinse your nether regions, however, are provided. This results in a mass of water on the floor that you must stand in to pee. Try squatting without touching anything and keeping your pants from touching anything either. Oh yeah. It’s 120 degrees in there too.

6. This country encourages businesses to hire people from other poor countries to come here and work. They have them sign contracts that are a decade long and then take their passports. Even though taking passports is supposedly illegal, the government knows it happens and does nothing to enforce the law. These poor people are promised a certain pay, but the companies neglect to tell them they will be deducting their cost of living from their paychecks, leaving them virtually penniless – that is, if they choose to pay them. Companies hold back paychecks for months at a time. When the workers strike as a result, they are jailed. Protesting is illegal, you see (apparently this law IS enforced).

These people will never make enough to buy a ticket home and even if they do, they do not have their passports. They live crammed in portables with tons of others, in highly unsanitary conditions. The kicker: they are building hotels that cost more to stay in for one night than they will make in an entire year. Things are so bad that a number of laborers are willing to throw themselves in front of cars because their death would bring their family affluence in the form of diya, blood money paid to the victim’s family as mandated by the government.

7. Things are not cheaper here. I’m sick of people saying that. I read the letters to the editor page of the paper and people say to those who complain about the cost of living rising here, “Well, it’s cheaper than your home country or you wouldn’t be here.” The only thing cheaper here is labor. Yes, you can have a maid – but a bag of washed lettuce will cost you almost $10.

8. There are traffic cameras everywhere. I consider this cheating. Where are the damn cops? I drove around this city for weeks before I ever even saw a cop. Trust me, they need traffic cops here. People drive like idiots. It’s perfectly okay to turn left from the far right lane, but speeding even just a couple of kilometers over will get you fined. These cameras are placed strategically as you come down hills, or just as the speed limit changes. Before you know it…BAM! Fined. Forget to pay the bill and your car will be impounded..

9. The clothing some of these women wear makes no sense to me. I understand that as part of your religion you are required to dress in a particular way, but a black robe over your jeans and turtleneck and cover your head when it is 120 degrees outside? In the gym some women wear five layers of clothing…sweatpants and t-shits over sweaters with headscarves. Yet the men’s clothing makes absolute sense: white, airy, and nothing underneath but their skivvies.

10. People stare at you. I am sick of being stared at. I’m stared at by men who have never seen a fair-skinned blue-eyed woman before, or who have and think we are all prostitutes so it’s okay to stare. They stare at me when I am fully covered or with my husband, and even follow me around. It’s beyond creepy and has brought me to tears on more than one occasion. The staring is not limited to men, either. I’m stared at angrily by female prostitutes who think I am running in on their territory by having a few drinks with my husband at the bar.

11. Prostitutes? Oh hell yes, there are prostitutes. Tons of them. So, let me get this straight, I can’t look at a naked picture of a person on the Internet in the privacy of my home, but it is okay to go out in public and buy a few for the night?. Any nationality any age any color. In short selected areas become brothel streets across Dubai. soliciting is done at metro stations, using bluetooth pairing or bbm pins passed over scrap papers.

12. Alcohol can only be sold in hotels and a handful of private clubs. A person must own a liquor license to consume in the privacy of their own home. To obtain a liquor license you must get signed approval from your boss, prove a certain level of salary that determines how much you are allowed to buy, and then submit several mug shots (aka passport photos) for approval. Pay the fee and the additional 30% tax on every purchase and you may drink at home. Then again, you can just pick up a few bottles in the airport duty free on your way in to the country, but two is the max. Why not just drive out to Ajman where it’s a free-for-all and load up the SUV? It’s easy enough, but crossing the Emirates with alcohol is illegal – particularly in the dry emirate of Sharjah, which just happens to lie between Dubai and Ajman. Go figure.

13. Not only do you have to get your boss’s approval to obtain a liquor license, but you must also get the company’s approval to rent property, have a telephone, or get satellite TV.

14. Back to the craziness on the roads: If I see one more kid standing up and waving to me out the back window while flying down the road at 160 kph…whatever happened to seatbelts?

15. When is the weekend again? Let me get this straight: the weekend used to be Thursday and Friday, but no one took off all of Thursday, just a half day really. Now the government says Friday and Saturday are the weekend, but some people only take off Friday, others still take a half day on Thursday, but some might just take a half day on Saturday instead. Anyway you slice it, Sundays are workdays and little business can be accomplished Thursday through Saturday.

16. There are few satellite television operators: OSN network under ownership of regions Richest man Mr. Walid bin Talal is seriously compromised. the content is dubbed and filtered. News channels seldom show the ground reality of human rights violation across GCC. The movie channels play movies that are old and outdated. Many of them went straight to video back in the States. Every sitcom that failed in the US has been purchased and is played here. Old episodes of Knight Rider are advertised like it is the coolest thing since sliced bread. The TV commercials are repeated so often that I am determined NOT to buy anything I see advertised on television here just for thee principle of it. When I say repeated often, I mean every commercial break – sometimes more than once.

17. The roads are horribly designed. Driving ten minutes out of the way to make a U-turn is not uncommon. People are not able to give directions most of the time (remember reason #1), and the maps are little help because most have few road names on them, if any. Where is interchange four? You just have to hope you got on the freeway in the right place and start counting because they are not numbered. Miss it and you’ll likely end up on the other side of town before you are able to turn around and go back.

18. Taxi drivers are over worked and smelly. Taxi drivers work very hard here to earn a living because travel by taxi is still relatively inexpensive, even though the cost of living is not (see reason #7). Because of this you may have a driver who has had little sleep or the opportunity to shower for several days. Many of these drivers have just as much difficulty finding their way around as you do, but add to this a third-world country driving style and extreme exhaustion and, well, remember to buckle up for safety.

19. Speeding is an Emirati sport and Emirates Road is just an extension of the Dubai Autodrome. I know I keep mentioning the roads, but really, much of this city’s issues are encompassed by the erratic and irrational behavior displayed on its streets. Visions of flashing lights on even flashier, limo-tinted SUVs haunt me as I merge on to the highway. Local nationals are somehow able to get the sun-protecting dark window tint denied to us expats and use it to hide their faces as they tailgate you incessantly at unbelievably high speeds, their lights flickering on and off and horn blaring repeatedly. It doesn’t matter that you can’t get over, or if doing so would be particularly dangerous, they will run you off the road to get in front of you. Don’t even think about giving someone the finger; the offense could land you in jail. Tailgating is, unbelievably, legal.

20. Dubai is far from environmentally friendly. Ever wonder how much damage those manmade islands are doing to the delicate ocean ecosystem? Coral reefs, sea grasses, and oyster beds that were once part of protected marine lands lie choked under a barrage of dredged up sea sand. Consider the waste that occurs from erecting buildings on top of these sand monsters and from the people that occupy them coupled with the lack of an effective recycling program and you have an environmental disaster on your hands. Add to this more gas guzzling SUVs than fuel-efficient cars on the road and the need for 24-hour powerful air-conditioning and its evident that the environment is not high on the priority list of the UAE.

So while I’m sure there are benefits to living in Dubai, tax breaks, multi-cultural environments, and beautiful buildings aside, reconsider your plans to move here if any of the above mentioned reasons strikes a chord within you. Dubai is a city caught in an identity crisis. Struggling somewhere between its desire to be a playground for the rich and its adherence to traditional Islamic roots, rests a city that lacks sufficient infrastructure to support its delusions of grandeur. Visit if you must, but leave quickly before you are sucked into its calamitous void.

Slump in Dubai property sector AGAIN

The head of an Abu Dhabi real estate firm backed by the Mubadala Group has predicted Dubai’s property sector will hit another slump in 18 to 24 months, saying the change was inevitable in an emerging market.

HERE is detail

TAX on way

The UAE is considering to impose a tax on the money that expatriates transfer to their home countries every year, government and banking sources said on last Friday.

Expat employees in the UAE transferred a net total of AED45.1 billion out of the country last year, up from AED41.2 billion in 2011, according to central bank data.

while in an opinion poll conducted by independent sources most expats consider it begining of TAXation culture in UAE.

Some locals consder it is as haram. “you will be mostly cutting up the hard earned money of the laborers and workers to fill up your filthy pockets. Those poor people sweat and bleed to earn and you want a free share? limit your greed? If UAE continues implementing these laws to earn easy money. Destruction awaits UAE” says Mohammed (a very common name in Muslim world)

another expat shares his opinion as:

Already the cost of living & spending has risen up a lot without any imposed incremental salary for expats. It is worth to mention that “impose tax on remittances” will impact on further forced spending at this stage. So it is not recommended at all to go for this proposal.

another expat from Indian subcontinent shares as:

It will encourage ‘Hundi’ transfers ( hundi is subcontinent terms for undeclared money transfers which works at light speed give cash in UAE, take cash in your country in next minute ) no questions asked.

Surfing in Aabaya

The dress code for women in Islam & the Gulf region GCC is quiet modest & these brave women are comfortable and enjoying the life

read here

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